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Yarpole Church where Millborough Brown and

Edward Pardoe were married 30th April 1692

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View Brian Loomes 1997 article on this clock

Click an image to superze

View original Marriage Register

View original Marriage Licence

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View original Edward Paro's Will

 

View original Marriage Licence

  llustrated here is a wonderfully historical 17th century verge lantern clock by Richard Savage of Much Wenlock in Shropshire. The names of the first owners,' Edw. Mill. Pardo' are engraved on the top fret. Research carried out in the 1980s by Brian Loomes and the late Douglas Elliott found that:-  Edward  Pardoe of ye parish of Milford Globe in ye County of Salop & Millborough Brown of ye parish of Yarpole in ye County of  Herefordshire were married by License in Yarpole on April 30th 1692.

 

    ore recent research suggests to me that the clock was probably purchased from Richard Savage by Millborough's father John Browne who would of had the clock specially made for his daughter’s wedding after consulting with Savage and then gifting it to the newlyweds on their special day in April 1692. The wedding ceremony took place in Yarpole Church.

 

     fter spending some time living in Yarpole, Edward and Millborough moved 12 miles away to live in Bitterley, Shropshire where in March 1695 they had a baby girl called Anna. However, sadly in the following year Millborough died in child birth and she was buried at Bitterley on September 14th, 1696. Their new baby boy, Johannes, was buried only thirteen days later on September 27th. Edward married again in 1699 and died in 1715, being buried back at Bitterley alongside his first wife, Millborough. The original Christenings, Weddings and Burials register for Yarpole still survive, as do the original Yarpole marriage license, in which Edward Pardoe and John Browne (Millborough’s father) have signed their names. Edward Pardo's will also survives.

 

 

 

 

 

    he lantern clock is very interesting in its own right. Not only has it

been made by Shropshires earliest known domestic clockmakers for whom work is known to survive today, but it is in a lovely original condition, which includes retaining its original verge escapement and all of its original wheelwork. It has goblet shaped collets and its original verge pendulum is positioned inside the back plate. The top and bottom plates are made of iron instead of brass and it has an integral iron hoop, indicating that Rchard Savage was a maker who clearly thought for himself. The superb single iron hand is original.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    ichard Savage was born in Wenlock Magna (the ancient name for Much Wenlock), Shropshire, on 2 August 1663, the son of William & Joan Savage. He was one of the middle children of a family with at least 11 children, not all of whom survived their childhood. Richard married Elizabeth Price of Bridge north in 1685/86, after he would have finished his apprenticeship. Their children included William, born in Wenlock Magna on 15th September 1687 and Thomas, also born in Wenlock Magna, on 17th August 1690. William was apprenticed to his father, in Shrewsbury, in 1700 and Thomas, also in Shrewsbury, in 1703 when both were aged 13. Elizabeth, Richards’s wife, died in Shrewsbury on 7th March 1722. Richard re-married, to Margaret Jones on 19th October 1726, but he himself died, in Shrewsbury, on 27th June, aged 64.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ichard Savage Lantern Clock.

Herefordshire, 30th April,

1692

Anno Domini

Made for ye Yarpole Wedding of

Edward  Pardo and  Millborough

Brown, at ye Yarpole church in

   he Salem witch trials occurred in colonial Massachusetts between 1692 and 1693. More than 200 people were accused of practicing witchcraft—the Devil's magic—and 20 were executed. Eventually, the colony admitted the trials were a mistake and compensated the families of those convicted. Since then, the story of the trials has become synonymous with paranoia and injustice, and it continues to beguile the popular imagination more than 300 years later.

 

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howing a close up of the superb original single iron hand

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ade for the marriage of  Edward Pardoe and Millborough Browne,

who were married by Licence at Yarpole Church,

Herefordshire, 30th April, 1692

FFecitt, 1692

ichard Savage 

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    everal clocks signed by Richard Savage are known, and some of these but not all, are dated. Richard was apprenticed around 1677, and was a qualified clockmaker from about 1684/5. There is a lantern clock dated 1692 which is illustrated here. (It has no place name but was made in Wenlock Magna) and another lantern dated 1694 signed  ' Wenlock Magna'. There are also several wall clocks by Savage dating from c 1696, signed '' Wenlock Magna' (all have beautifully engraved square dials) and a wall clock is known to exist by Savage that is dated 1688. Recent examples to have come to light by Savage include an oak paneled longcase dating from the c1680s and a primitive hooded wall clock that is also believed to possibily date during the 1680s. Finally there is a round dial  iron cased hook-and-spike of the c1720s (illustrated on this website).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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    he question arises as to who taught Richard Savage his skills. While unsophisticated, his work shows good attention to detail and decoration, and is in no way crude. He is most unlikely to have been able to teach himself, in those days, to an acceptable standard. There is no evidence about his apprenticeship, and one can only conjecture. Assuming that the date of 1677 is right for the start of his apprenticeship, there were 5 clockmakers working in Shropshire at that time, with 3 watchmakers working in Shrewsbury. Of the clockmakers, two worked at the other end of the county and another appears to be an itinerant church clock repairer. The most likely candidates appear to be William Haseldine of Rowton (working 1672-1726) about 15 miles from Much Wenlock, Edward Norton of Berrington (1680), 8 miles from Much Wenlock, and Richard Bird of Much Wenlock itself. The formers two existence is only known from the records of repairs to church clocks in those places, so they might have been itinerants too. Richard Bird, however, was born in Wenlock Magna on 25th August 1605, and married there on 3rd March 1632. He would have been 72 when Savage started his apprenticeship and 79 when Savage became free – he was definitely working in 1659 and the possibility that he was Savages mentor is strongest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Summary

   ichard Savage's Lantern clock dated 1692, is a really nice and exciting find because it is very hard to locate genuine surviving 17th century examples which reveal their known year of origin and exact date of ownership. In this case we also have the added excitement of having the original marriage license showing Edward Pardoe's signature which was probably signed on the actual day he and his new bride Millborough first received their then brand new clock on the 30th of April 1692. The same document also shows the signature of John Brown (Millborough’s father), who I think is the most likely person who initially travelled the 29 miles from Yarpole to Much Wenlock to see Richard Savage and discuss having a 'special clock' made for his daughters wedding. In my opinion, it is an historically important surviving lantern clock for both the village of Yarpole (Herefordshire) and town of Wenlock Magna (Shropshire) since both places had a big part to play in the clocks existence!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Please Contact Lee Borrett

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Shropshires earliest domestic Clockmaker for whom work is known to survive today.

 

  n December 2015, The Community Website for Yarpole Parish published a Living History Newsletter that was written by Rhianon Turrell. It had some interesting new information which I enclose here.

 

    ilborough was baptised in Yarpole in September 1667 daughter of John &Ann Browne making her 24 years old when she married Edward Pardoe

 

     ilborough’s father John Browne appears on the marriage licence and in the christening register of Yarpole. There are only a few Brown(e)s in the Yarpole registers but John Brown is referred to in a memorandum of 1672 that Thomas & John Bedford gave up all their rights to the pews lately enclosed by John Brown gent. If this is the same John Brown (the ‘e’ seems to come & go) this would imply he is a man of some substance to enclose the pews and style himself gent. This would match with the magnificent wedding present.

 

 

 

     y thanks go out to Brian Loomes for allowing me to use any information on this website - that he has previously had published in text books or magazines regarding Richard Savage and this clock.

 

    y thanks go out to Rhianon Turrell and the Yarpole Community website for publishing this new information which adds weight to my theory that it was probably John Browne (Millborough's father) who purchased the clock from Richard Savage for his daughter’s wedding in 1692 as I can only imagine that it was a very expensive item to buy at the time!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News Update

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Acknowledgement

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arpole Church, where Millborough Brown and Edward Pardoe

  are thought to have been married on the 30th April 1692

ichard Savage clock Wanted in any condition.

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wonderfully historicYarpole Wedding Clock. Made by Richard Savage,                    

 

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Cick an image to view

View Brian Loomes 1997 article on this clock

View original Yarpole Weddings Register

View Edward Pardo's Will

An Important, Related Historical Event

The Salem Witch Trials 1692

1692  Witch  2D 1692  Witch Trial 1C

A women protests as one of her accusers, a young girl, appears to have convulsions.

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Two women stand on trial in 1692 with guards, as the accusing girls demonstrate their demonic afflictions.

The Salem Witch Trials

     everal centuries ago, many practicing Christians, and those of other religions, had a strong belief that the Devil could give certain people known as witches the power to harm others in return for their loyalty. A "witchcraft craze" rippled through Europe from the 1300s to the end of the 1600s. Tens of thousands of supposed witches—mostly women—were executed. Though the Salem trials came on just as the European craze was winding down, local circumstances explain their onset.

 

   n 1689, English rulers William and Mary started a war with France in the American colonies. Known as King William's War to colonists, it ravaged regions of upstate New York, Nova Scotia and Quebec, sending refugees into the county of Essex and, specifically, Salem Village in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. (Salem Village is present-day Danvers, Massachusetts; colonial Salem Town became what's now Salem.)

 

 

 

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Salem Struggling

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   he displaced people created a strain on Salem's resources. This aggravated the existing rivalry between families with ties to the wealth of the port of Salem and those who still depended on agriculture. Controversy also brewed over Reverend Samuel Parris, who became Salem Village's first ordained minister in 1689, and was disliked because of his rigid ways and greedy nature. The Puritan villagers believed all the quarreling was the work of the Devil.

 

  n January of 1692, Reverend Parris' daughter Elizabeth, age 9, and niece Abigail Williams, age 11, started having "fits." They screamed, threw things, uttered peculiar sounds and contorted themselves into strange positions, and a local doctor blamed the supernatural. Another girl, Ann Putnam, age 11, experienced similar episodes. On February 29, under pressure from magistrates Jonathan Corwin and John Hathorne, the girls blamed three women for afflicting them: Tituba, the Parris' Caribbean slave; Sarah Good, a homeless beggar; and Sarah Osborne, an elderly impoverished woman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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     ll three women were brought before the local magistrates and interrogated for several days, starting on March 1, 1692. Osborne claimed innocence, as did Good. But Tituba confessed, "The Devil came to me and bid me serve him." She described elaborate images of black dogs, red cats, yellow birds and a "black man"who wanted her to sign his book. She admitted that she signed the book and said there were several other witches looking to destroy the Puritans. All three women were put in jail.

 

        ith the seed of paranoia planted, a stream of accusations followed for the next few months. Charges against Martha Corey, a loyal member of the Church in Salem Village, greatly concerned the community; if she could be a witch, then anyone could. Magistrates even questioned Sarah Good's 4-year-old daughter, Dorothy, and her timid answers were construed as a confession. The questioning got more serious in April when Deputy Governor Thomas Danforth and his assistants attended the hearings. Dozens of people from Salem and other Massachusetts villages were brought in for questioning.

 

      n May 27, 1692, Governor William Phipps ordered the establishment of a Special Court of Oyer (to hear) and Terminer (to decide) for Suffolk, Essex and Middlesex counties. The first case brought to the special court was Bridget Bishop, an older woman known for her gossipy habits and promiscuity. When asked if she committed witchcraft, Bishop responded, "I am as innocent as the child unborn."The defense must not have been convincing, because she was found guilty and, on June 10, became the first person hanged on what was later called Gallows Hill.

 

    ive days later, respected minister Cotton Mather wrote a letter imploring the court not to allow spectral evidence—testimony about dreams and visions. The court largely ignored this request and five people were sentenced and hanged in July, five more in August and eight in September. On October 3, following in his son's footsteps, Increase Mather, then president of Harvard, denounced the use of spectral evidence: "It were better that ten suspected witches should escape than one innocent person be condemned."

 

     overnor Phipps, in response to Mather's plea and his own wife being questioned for witchcraft, prohibited further arrests, released many accused witches and dissolved the Court of Oyer and Terminer on October 29. Phipps replaced it with a Superior Court of Judicature, which disallowed spectral evidence and only condemned 3 out of 56 defendants. Phipps eventually pardoned all who were in prison on witchcraft charges by May 1693. But the damage had been done: 19 were hanged on Gallows Hill, a 71-year-old man was pressed to death with heavy stones, several people died in jail and nearly 200 people, overall, had been accused of practicing "the Devil's magic."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Martha Cory in jail for witchcraft with her prosecutors. She was convicted by 'spectral evidence' provided by the young Ann Putman. She was executed by hanging on Sept. 22, 1692

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Witch Hunt

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    ollowing the trials and executions, many involved, like judge Samuel Sewall, publicly confessed error and guilt. On January 14, 1697, the General Court ordered a day of fasting and soul-searching for the tragedy of Salem. In 1702, the court declared the trials unlawful. And in 1711, the colony passed a bill restoring the rights and good names of those accused and granted £600 restitution to their heirs. However, it was not until 1957—more than 250 years later—that Massachusetts formally apologized for the events of 1692.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restoring Good Names

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1692 Witch document

Acknowledgement

       ost of the above information about The Salem Witch Trials was taken from an article entitled A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials

By Jess Blumberg of smithsonian.com, October 23, 2007

 

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/a-brief-history-of-the-salem-witch-trials-175162489/#duPejSfofw3A0WVi.99

 

 

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Brian Loomes Article

Wanted

       hilst the Richard Savage lantern clock was being gifted to the happy

couple Edward and Millborough during their wedding day on 18th April 1692, there was a much more sinister event taking place on the other side of the Atlantic in which innocent women were being tried and executed for Witchcraft.

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Further Reading